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Quilts: Masterworks From The American Folk Art Museum

0 Quilts: Masterworks From The American Folk Art MuseumThe Antiques and the Arts Weekly’s cover; Quilts: Masterworks From The American Folk Art Museum.

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Brighton or Manchester for a 19 year-old American to study abroad Spring 2012?

I’m a Psychology major with a double minor in Speech and Hearing Science (Language Pathology) and Dance. I currently live in Arizona and have never been to Europe, so quite frankly I’m more interested in the city than the school’s prestige. It’s between University of Sussex and University of Manchester.

I’m into history, art and music (folk, indie pop and rock). I’d love a location that makes it easy for me to travel to London, Wales, Ireland and France–specifically.

I’m concerned about the history part with both Brighton and Manchester. Are there any historical gems besides museums in either city? Also, what are the trade offs from living in either city?

I really appreciate any advice or input… it’s kinda hard just relying on the school’s websites!

Lastly, I’m a laid back girl who values good conversation and kicking back with buddies. But exciting nights out are a must icon wink Brighton or Manchester for a 19 year old American to study abroad Spring 2012?

To visit London, Brighton is only 51 minutes by train from London Victoria. In london you can connect to anywhere else in the country. To visit Paris you can get the Eurostar direct from St Pancras International. Welsh trains leave from London Paddington – you’re better off flying to Ireland.

Flight to Ireland depart from most London Airports but the nearest airport to Brighton is London Gatwick and Aer Lingus fly from there direct to Dublin.

If you’re looking for Historical gems – Brighton has a former Royal Palace – The Brighton Pavilion, it’s open to the public. Brighton and Hove is a far smaller City than Manchester and easier to get around, although if you’re at Sussex you may be able to live on Campus as it’s some way from Central Brighton.

Brighton or Manchester for a 19 year-old American to study abroad Spring 2012?

I’m a Psychology major with a double minor in Speech and Hearing Science (Language Pathology) and Dance. I currently live in Arizona and have never been to Europe, so quite frankly I’m more interested in the city than the school’s prestige. It’s between University of Sussex and University of Manchester.

I’m into history, art and music (folk, indie pop and rock). I’d love a location that makes it easy for me to travel to London, Wales, Ireland and France–specifically.

I’m concerned about the history part with both Brighton and Manchester. Are there any historical gems besides museums in either city? Also, what are the trade offs from living in either city?

I really appreciate any advice or input… it’s kinda hard just relying on the school’s websites!

Lastly, I’m a laid back girl who values good conversation and kicking back with buddies. But exciting nights out are a must icon wink Brighton or Manchester for a 19 year old American to study abroad Spring 2012?

I love both cities but they are totally different

Brighton – seaside town with a hippy vibe and large gay scene. Easy to get to Lonon (1 hour on the train) loads of small shops.

Manchester – big city with an airport so easy to get to France and Ireland by air. Also closer to Wales and the Lake district. Great shopping, lots of bigger shops and designer shops. How much history do you want? It was a roman fort, centre of the industrial revoloution and all points in between. Also has a thriving gay scene.

Basically if you are happier in a real city go to Manchester, if you feel more like strolling onm the sea front then go to Brighton.

Personally I’d go for Manchester, it is more central, has great links to the rest of the UK and Europe, the uni is better. You are also close to Chester – great for history and for weekends yu can head to Yorkshire, Wales, the Lakes, Blackpool – it’s an experience if nothing else.

Brighton or Manchester for a 19 year-old American to study abroad Spring 2012?

I’m a Psychology major with a double minor in Speech and Hearing Science (Language Pathology) and Dance. I currently live in Arizona and have never been to Europe, so quite frankly I’m more interested in the city than the school’s prestige. It’s between University of Sussex and University of Manchester.

I’m into history, art and music (folk, indie pop and rock). I’d love a location that makes it easy for me to travel to London, Wales, Ireland and France–specifically.

I’m concerned about the history part with both Brighton and Manchester. Are there any historical gems besides museums in either city? Also, what are the trade offs from living in either city?

I really appreciate any advice or input… it’s kinda hard just relying on the school’s websites!

Lastly, I’m a laid back girl who values good conversation and kicking back with buddies. But exciting nights out are a must icon wink Brighton or Manchester for a 19 year old American to study abroad Spring 2012?

the world will already be over by then, no worries.

ideas for songs for my english paper?

So, for my college english class, i have to write an proposal paper (written in the classical argument style) about why a certain song should be chosen for the Smithosian Institute American Heritage Museum’s "Annual Songs of American Heritage Festival Exhibit."

I need help choosing what song I want to be nominated- remember it has to be convincing. Here are the basic requirements:
-great contribution to arts/humanities
-displays diverse cultural and ethnic heritage of the USA and its territories
-reflect the past and present
-great social importance to a particular community and/or region of the nation and/or nation as a whole
-enduring value

this can be from the latest pop song to a traditional folk song- it doesn’t have to be a song that is universally known or anything, so give me your suggestions please! I’d really appreciate it. Remember it has to have most or all of the requirements above so PLEASE READ THEM BEFORE RESPONDING! remember this is a college class so it has to be a good song, so those of you who are knowledgable of music or just know of a song that meets the above requirements, please share!

thank you, and i will really appreciate your ideas and suggestions. if you respond, please give me the artist and title so i can look it up haha. and background information about the song is always appreciated!

The first song that comes to my mind is "American Pie" by Don McLean.
If one deciphers it, it covers a great deal of the heritage of rock and roll; for instance, "Jack Flash" was of course, Mick Jagger; "the Girl who Sang the Blues" was Janis Joplin, etc. etc.
If you’re not familiar with the song, google the lyrics.
Alternately, you could perhaps use the folk classic "This Land is Your Land" by Woodie Guthrie, who penned it in response to monopolies and Corporate America’s greed.

Can someone reccomend some neighborhoods to live in Philadelphia, PA?

My wife and I are planning to move to Philadelphia this summer and are wondering if maybe some of you folks that are familiar with the area can lend a hand. Here are some of our criteria:
-We want city life, not suburbia. Suburbia just isn’t our thing.
-We would like it to be relatively safe, basically meaning just no crack houses and things like that (we’ve had our fair share of that here in California)
-We love lofts and factory converted housing, industrial style.

From research we’ve gathered we’ve found these areas:
Society Hill, Center City, Art Museum District, Fish Town, also near Broad street and independence hall.
We are a very american-history focused family so anything regarding that would help.
Thanks!

Society Hill…it’s a very nice area near the river and is surrounded by almost all of Philadelphia’s history, including the Liberty Bell, the Constitution Center and Independence Mall. I don’t know about houses in that area other than I would expect them to be $$$$. It seems like it’s mostly condos to me and you’re still neighbors with a Sheraton Inn. I don’t know much about the safety of the area as I mostly pass through there to South Street and Headhouse Square, which is right around the corner and definitely something to consider.

http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=society+hill,+philadelphia&sll=37.0625,-95.677068&sspn=48.956293,51.064453&ie=UTF8&hq=society+hill,&hnear=Philadelphia,+PA&ll=39.9456,-75.146195&spn=0.005626,0.010321&z=17

Center City…depends on who you ask, since Center City can mean different things to different people. Lots of new construction, but mostly condos. Center City stays alive at night at least, not like other cities I’ve been to (mostly Midwest). While I wouldn’t call it any safer or more dangerous, you will be dealing with a lot more strangers in this area. Visitors, people from NJ and the ‘burbs, business professionals, etc.

http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&q=City+Hall,&sll=39.950642,-75.16202&sspn=0.011251,0.020642&ie=UTF8&split=1&rq=1&ev=zi&radius=0.55&hq=City+Hall,&hnear=&ll=39.950642,-75.16202&spn=0.011251,0.020642&z=16

Art Museum Area…another area with an identity crisis. You can also look into the Spring Garden section, Fairmount, the Art Museum Area and Brewerytown (<–eh…skip this one). It’s a very family oriented area in my mind and has one of the best schools in the country right there: Masterman Charter School (ranked no. 52 NATIONALLY for charter schools). You’re also walking distance to what I would consider Philly’s second most historical area, and that’s the Art Museum–it’s kind of neat living in the shadow of an international icon. That being said, you’re also not very far from Temple University, North Philly and there are a lot of public elementary and high schools in that area. It typically amounts to nothing more than a large group of kids being loud in the street, but I’ve also seen some large fights because of it.

http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=Art+Museum+Area,+Philadelphia&sll=39.950642,-75.16202&sspn=0.011251,0.020642&ie=UTF8&hq=Art+Museum+Area,&hnear=Philadelphia,+PA&ll=39.966333,-75.167384&spn=0.011249,0.020642&z=16

Fishtown…I love it in Fishtown. Someone had mentioned the different parts of Fishtown, but really, you need to be either north of York Avenue or west of Front Street (Kensington), so you’re not really in Fishtown anymore. It’s an old Irish/Polish neighborhood that’s remained pretty much the same since they all immigrated here. There are a lot of old bars that look more like glorified VFWs than hangouts, but the people in them are golden. It’s a mixed neighborhood of old lifers and new transplants. There are also a couple of great new projects going up in Fishtown that are building off of each other, including one that boasts LEED certification. Look for Memphis Flats and the Ice House Condos…both are "loft style". If you stop through, make your way into Memphis Taproom for one of the best beer lists around. Fishtown is a very eclectic area.

http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=Fishtown,+Philadelphia&sll=39.966333,-75.167384&sspn=0.011249,0.020642&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=Northern+Liberties%2F+Fishtown&ll=39.970575,-75.13494&spn=0.011659,0.020642&z=16

Broad Street is also a pretty generic term as it runs from one unsavory area into another, but the middle can be nice. It’s known as the Avenue of the Arts near Center City and has a large majority of Philadelphia’s art culture, including the Kimmel Center and many of our theaters. Once you go north of Market Street at City Hall, Broad Street becomes a wasteland. You have a couple of OK blocks through the Spring Garden section I mentioned earlier (Osteria = great northern Italian, 640 Lofts = well, lofts). North of that however is where Temple starts. If you’re on Broad Street on Temple’s campus, you’d better be looking for parking for class, or looking to turn around. On the south end is South Philly…the traditional South Philly you hear about all the time. It doesn’t boast as large of an Italian Culture as it used to, but there are still some thick pockets. You’re also close to the stadiums at this point and will have to deal with people thinking they know shortcuts through the city, i.e. your neighborhood.

Finally ,something you didn’t mention is Northern Liberties. NL is just south of Fishtown, and if Fishtown is too quiet, too hokey or too family oriented, than NL should be your spot. This is where the newest project, The Piazza opened up (http://traveler.nationalgeographic.com/on-foot/philadelphia/on-foot-philadelphia.pdf). N

when i put tags on YouTube it says put at least one tag for my video?

is it too much tags? these are all the tags i put in
random video blog wisdom airplane auto boat motorcycle motor sport train animation blooper improv parody stand-up spoof sketch short film series visual arts media medicine performing arts physical science social science math humanities engineering economics computer science health athletics business communications advertising tv trailer commercials entertainment news video game web series filmmaker reel anime interview art manga documentary tutorial arts crafts fitness food beauty home gardening dance music drink sports finance technology world music unsigned soul rock religious rap r&amp;b pop jazz indie hip-hop folk blues classical country electronic alternative political commercial grassroots outreach commentary analysis gotcha! state government regional government local government nonprofit public service announcements federal government dating wildlife reptile aquatic bird cat dog hamster insect rabbit electronics diy aviation space mechanics gadget environment winter sports soccer basketball baseball martial arts water sport track field tennis sports talk combat sports extreme hockey golf action american football travel log culture cruise nature cityscape museum adventure landmark events destination

It’s a little too much. Heres a hint how to get more views, put about 13 tags that have to do with famous stuff (example:xxx charlestrippy fred smosh) stuff like that

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