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David Grossman: To the End of the Land

0 David Grossman: To the End of the Land92Y Poetry Center: http://www.92y.org/shop/category.asp?category=888Unterberg+Poetry+Center888&ev_ads=YouTube_PoetryCenter

From the Poetry Center Archive: David Grossman March 23, 2008.
See him tonight, October 11, 2010, with Paul Auster at the 92nd Street Y: http://bit.ly/cpVAnH

In March of 2008, as part of the Poetry Center’s Festival of Hebrew Literature, David Grossman appeared at 92Y for an interview with Adam Rovner. The conversation took place on a Sunday morning. That night, in Israel, Mr. Grossman’s new novel—Isha Borachat Mi-besorah—was published. Tonight, he returns to New York to read from the novel’s translation—To the End of the Land.

Today’s featured recording is an excerpt from that 2008 conversation, in which Mr. Grossman discusses To the End of the Land.

About the novel, Paul Auster—who will introduce and then interview Mr. Grossman at tonight’s reading—has said: “Flaubert created his Emma, Tolstoy made his Anna, and now we have Grossman’s Ora—as fully alive, as fully embodied as any character in recent fiction.” During the 2008 conversation, Mr. Grossman talked about “writing women”:

When I write about a woman, I do not think that I am writing about woman as a concept or as a state of mind or a state of body. I just tune myself totally—or as much as I can—to this character that I’m writing about, and I try to be absorbed by her to the utmost. I don’t know if something she does is feminine or masculine, I just don’t know it. I just know that for this specific character this is the right way to act. It is a very intuitive decision, the choices I make while I’m writing. I think that most of the women I write about are women I appreciate—unlike the men. The men I write about—usually I do not really appreciate them. The women I write about are stronger, deeper, more complex characters. They are less afraid of being in tight contact with reality, with their inner reality. Why is it like that? I have no idea. It has something to do with the fact that I feel that I myself was very much created or shaped—brought up—by women, enhanced more by women than by men. [In To the End of the Land], the main character is a woman, and she is the engine behind the whole book, and she motivates the men. Probably this is how I look at the world . . .

In an ongoing effort to share with our readers some of the great literary moments which the Poetry Center has presented across the decades, this blog has begun to feature regular postings of archival recordings. To purchase tickets to tonight’s October 11, 2010 reading by David Grossman, please visit here: http://bit.ly/cpVAnH To look at the rest of the season’s line-up, please visit here:http://bit.ly/ayI8Um And for access to other recordings, please click here: http://bit.ly/9IdD86

Unterberg Poetry Center webcasts and access to our archive are made possible in part by the generous support of the Sidney E. Frank Foundation.

See all upcoming events in 92Y Poetry Center Main Reading Series: http://bit.ly/PoetryCenter_MainReadingSeries

Duration : 0:5:6

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