Follow inmuseums on Twitter

Undoing the Inquisition

Tue, Jan 11, 2011, 8:15pm

Rabbi Juan Mejia, moderator

Forcibly converted during the Inquisition, many Jews continued to practice their religion in secrecy for several decades, after which time some were able to escape to lands of religious tolerance, while others assimilated into the Catholic majority. Or did they? Join Rabbi Juan Mejia – who himself discovered his Jewish ancestry at age 15 – in exploring the world of Anusim (descendants of those converted by force or coercion) and learn about his work with Anusim communities in Latin America and the American Southwest.

Uncategorized

12 Responses to “Undoing the Inquisition”

  • Dana1981 says:

    Will Cuccinelli's Inquisition damage Virginia universities?
    Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli continues to pursue his witch hunt of Professor Michael Mann, formerly of the University of Virginia (UVA), now at Penn State. Cuccinelli initially tried to subpoena UVA for documents related to Mann’s research while at the university. A Virginia judge threw his case out, ruling that Cuccinelli had failed to state an objective reason to believe that Mann committed fraud as he sought public grants to fund his research.
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/10/05/AR2010100504908.html

    Quite obviously Cuccinelli has no case. He’s wasted untold amounts of Virginia taxpayer money and is embarrassing the state. As the second article concludes,

    "To defend itself from Mr. Cuccinelli’s investigation into the distribution of a $214,700 research grant, the University of Virginia has spent $350,000, with more to come, and that doesn’t count the taxpayer funds Mr. Cuccinelli is devoting to this cause. Sadly, though, that’s the smallest of the costs. The damage to Virginia’s reputation, and to its universities’ ability to attract and retain top-notch faculty and students, will not be easily undone."

    Aside from flushing taxpayer money down the toilet, do you think that these frivolous attacks by the state’s attorney general will inhibit Virginia universities’ ability to attract scientists? Personally I think I would be hesitant to take a job at a university in a state where the attorney general is waging war against its scientists.
    Ottawa – Mann isn’t a federal employee.
    Ottawa for f*ck sake, take a few minutes to learn what the FOIA is instead of continuing to embarrass yourself.

  • I expel CO2 everytime I breathe says:

    WOW, that is some great journalism when they say " witch hunt ". I just bet these people are just unbiasedly reporting the news. [sarcasm implied]
    To answer your question, NO. In fact, if universities actually started to act in a manner consistent with scientific principles instead of political ideologies, then they would be improved. In fact, if they tried the really different tact and being open and honest, they might not be spending so much on spin-doctors who convince the media to say obviously biased garbage like "witch hunt". You are right, this is a waste of taxpayers money. Release the information and stop wasting our money.
    References :

  • Paul B says:

    Yes.

    In fact, Cuccinelli’s kind of conduct (backed up with Expel’s kind of attitude) is bound to affect the decisions of any university scientist thinking of moving to Virginia,and indeed of any scientist outside the US contemplating a position at any American university.

    As for the idea that academics need the likes of Cuccinelli to show them what honest conduct is, that is a symptom of an attitude so far from reality, and so hostile to any ideas that differ from those of the rabidf right, that …
    References :
    … I left

  • Eric says:

    You may believe that what Mr. Mann did was perfectly alright, but many people do not. This entire global warming doom and gloom charade needs to have a lot of bright light shone upon it to reveal the truth concerning all of the available data.

    I do not see why UVA felt it necessary to "defend" itself, was it being sued? Or were they actively defending Mr. Mann? Defending a professor necessitates doing some homework to ensure that the professor is worthy of defending, and not just wasting a bunch of time and money in a losing cause. Personally i believe that the ranks of academia leadership needs a thorough housecleaning in order to restore some honesty to what is taught on campus.
    References :

  • A Modest Proposal says:

    It can only be expected. Whether or not investigations come to fruition has little bearing on the effects the investigations have on those who were investigated. Almost nobody will want to work somewhere that was subpoenaed for fraud. Nobody would also want to work where they might be the next victim of a rogue attorney general whose main goal is apparently to grasp at straws because he feels deep in his heart that the bad guys are in that building. He may have been right if he was in a movie drama. He’s not.

    Good for UVA for not giving in to this man’s whims. There’s a certain level of dignity and reputation one loses when he allows himself to be railroaded by another – the same applies to universities. To complain that the University is the reason taxpayers’ money is being wasted is beyond rationality. Does the nerd get blamed when he causes disruption by standing up to the bully? Oh, the extent to which that analogy applies here…
    References :

  • jyushchyshyn says:

    "You may believe that what Mr. Mann did was perfectly alright, but many people do not."

    You may believe that what Mr. Galileo did was perfectly alright, but many people do not.

    First of all, he is Dr. Mann or Professor Mann. You do not address a pH. D. scientist as Mr.
    The people who do not think that what Dr. Mann did was perfectly right are ignorant of science. When Dr. Mann initiated the research project which led to the publication of the Hockey Stick, his obligation was not to suppress data which contradicted what was then the widely held view that the Medieval Warm Period was warmer than the present but to publish that data. Of course, if people have any actual evidence that Michael Mann was wrong, rather than suspending his constitutional rights and pretending that they live in Nazi Germany, they could publish their evidence in a peer reviewed scientific journal.

    By the way, what was so shocking about the Hockey Stick? I thought that they did not drive SUVs during the Medieval Warm Period.

    To I expel CO2 everytime I act like a troll

    Universities publish results different from what you want to hear because that is where the scientific method leads them.

    "I think the citizens of the state will soon demand Cuccinelli’s head on a platter for wasting the state’s time and money, as well as making it look silly."

    I sure hope so.

    edit

    Under Virginia state law, how many years could Cuccinelli get for criminal malicious prosecution?

    "Personally i believe that the ranks of academia leadership needs a thorough housecleaning in order to restore some honesty to what is taught on campus."

    Yeah. Universities should only teach denialist propaganda.
    References :

  • Ottawa Mike says:

    I’m still trying to figure out why this is a subpoena and not a FOIA request?

    Edit: Dana, this has nothing to with Mann. The question is, has the data been produced using public money. If so, it is not private data and should be available to anyone who requests, even without stating a reason. If the data is private or funded privately, then yes, a subpoena is needed with a valid justification.
    References :

  • pegminer says:

    The biggest damage has been to the Virginia Attorney General’s office. I suspect that Cuccinelli will end up being impeached for abuse of power. Unless there is no crime in Virginia, which is very hard to imagine, I think the citizens of the state will soon demand Cuccinelli’s head on a platter for wasting the state’s time and money, as well as making it look silly.
    References :

  • Blackadder says:

    When the shoe is on the other foot Cuccinelli seems much slower to act
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ken_Cuccinelli#Campaign_contributions
    References :

  • The Vampire Muffin Man says:

    Yes. Obviously if you don’t think the way that Cuccinelli wants you to, you may be subject to investigation, even though it’s not his job as AG to investigate anything.

    [re: I expel's answer]
    >>WOW, that is some great journalism when they say " witch hunt ".<<
    What else would you call it? It’s certainly not a legitimate investigation (if that was even Cuccinelli’s job).

    >>I just bet these people are just unbiasedly reporting the news. [sarcasm implied]<<
    What would you consider unbiased?

    >>To answer your question, NO.<<
    You’re wrong.

    >>In fact, if universities actually started to act in a manner consistent with scientific principles instead of political ideologies, then they would be improved.<<
    Is that up to the government to decide? Should they be prosecuted on trumped up charges whenever an AG doesn’t agree with a conclusion?

    >>In fact, if they tried the really different tact and being open and honest, they might not be spending so much on spin-doctors who convince the media to say obviously biased garbage like "witch hunt".<<
    They are spending the money defending themselves as much as anything else. Do you really think that it’s in their best interests to give Cuccinelli whatever he wants? Would *YOU* want to study or teach at a university that would accede to the errant whims of a politician?

    >>You are right, this is a waste of taxpayers money.<<
    I think you’re confused as to the person ultimately responsible for the waste.

    >>Release the information and stop wasting our money.<<
    They aren’t legally obligated to release the information and to do so without a legal demand would ruin their credibility. Would you study law at a university that failed to protect it’s own legal rights? Would you want to study science at a university that had such a fundamental failure on it’s record?

    I wouldn’t.

    [re: Eric's answer]
    >>You may believe that what Mr. Mann did was perfectly alright, but many people do not.<<
    What did he do? He hasn’t been proven guilty, therefor he’s innocent.

    >>This entire global warming doom and gloom charade needs to have a lot of bright light shone upon it to reveal the truth concerning all of the available data.<<
    Cuccinelli isn’t requesting data. The data is freely available.

    >>I do not see why UVA felt it necessary to "defend" itself, was it being sued?<<
    No. It’s being investigated. Evidently someone is accusing a past member of the faculty of commiting fraud in their name.

    >>Or were they actively defending Mr. Mann?<<
    As well they should.

    >>Defending a professor necessitates doing some homework to ensure that the professor is worthy of defending, and not just wasting a bunch of time and money in a losing cause.<<
    I’m pretty sure that they know what they’re doing…

    >>Personally i believe that the ranks of academia leadership needs a thorough housecleaning in order to restore some honesty to what is taught on campus.<<
    That’s up to the universities…or are you suggesting that the government get involved?

    Edit for Ottowa:
    They aren’t requesting ‘the data’… They are requesting e-mails and other records.

    _
    References :

  • andy says:

    You are correct that Mann isn’t a Federal employee, but he is a State employee who gets a lot of grant money from Governments.

    But you are also correct that it is senseless to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars trying to attack people even if their scientific research is more opinion.
    References :

  • d/dx+d/dy+d/dz says:

    The damage is already done. From outside the US the distinction between Virginia and the rest of the country is less distinct than within. The real damage goes far beyond the money wasted by Cuccinelli in a witch hunt. Virginia will have trouble attracting and retaining academics and those academics that remain will have trouble attracting corporate support. When funding R&D, business looks at both the quality of academic researchers available and the political risk. Cuccinelli is a political risk. No company likes its operations tied up with politically motivated audits.
    References :

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Follow inmuseums on Twitter

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner